Being optimistic, having a positive expectation about succeeding, having the toughness and elasticity to bounce back after a problem or setback to attain success, are foundational staples for your real estate life.  Optimism (that hopeful attitude) combined with resilience and the skills you’ve been working on, feed off of one another.  The more optimism and resilience you have, the more likely you’ll be successful as an agent under any market conditions.

Let’s discuss maximizing the skill development side of resilience by utilizing an optimistic mindset.

People who are resilient tend to think that they never truly fail.  Why?  Because resilient people define failure as a time for growth and redirection….as a time to try.  Those with resilience are constantly trying, constantly seeking growth — they are not failures.  Sure, experiencing failure and disappointment hit hard but resilient people believe that most successes in life come from a combination of 80% things not panning out (and therefore reworking/refining those circumstances) and 20% intended goals/outcomes actually panning out.

People who develop resilience tend to ride on internal qualities, not external triggers from what others say to or about them.  They work on honing their inner qualities, skills, and strengths that will lead them to better opportunities.  Agent “Sally Sue” knows she’s great at creating inventory even during times of inventory shortages…she’ll continue to pursue every lead, even if it appears to be a dead end, so she’ll be ready to serve buyers whom other agents can’t.

Resilient people write down what is most important.  Knowing the “why” of your long term goals, your value based affirmations, helps to create resilience.  By writing down what you care about most, you’ll remember what you care about and you’ll work hard to attain it. Your goals/value based affirmations won’t get lost in the haze of short term difficulties and mundane to-do lists.

People who develop resilience focus on their strengths and fine tuning those strengths.  Of course, they’re aware of their weaknesses…and they accommodate them…but by growing their strengths, they’re doubling down on what they know they do well and not beating themselves up for what they don’t.

Remember, resilience is not a birth right.  It is a developing skill that comes out of hard times and setbacks in life…a skill that enables us to see challenges differently and creatively so we can bounce back. Certainly, agents who live in constantly fluctuating great and difficult markets can benefit by becoming evermore resilient.