Home security is a very big deal within the housing industry. More and more innovations are coming into the market all the time and most of them enable homeowners and property managers to monitor their respective homes and properties through all-in-one systems via cell phones.

Cell phones are now able to turn off the stove or buzz people into homes and buildings. Voice commands via cell phones can tell virtual assistants to shut the garage door. Robots that patrol properties have shifted watch systems and intercoms to cell phones…all while the cell phone owner is off cooking dinner or off traveling the world.

Single-family home security products can detect water leaks and open doors/windows. SimpliSafe offers DIY kits that include monitoring systems. Nortek Security and Control sells add-ons to video cameras and intrusion sensors for stove and gun monitors under the brands of ELAN and 2GIG. If a stove is left on or a gun removed from a locked location, the cellphone owner is immediately notified.

Smart access systems and cameras operated by cellphones to allow/stop guests and packages into the home or building are becoming ubiquitous. Amazon’s Ring, Doorport and ButterflyMX are gaining popularity as must-have amenities.

Amazon’s Ring Video Doorbell

Security robots that look like R2D2 with cylindrical tops like spacecraft amble through property grounds and home yards as “an extra set of eyes” as well as providing data analytics. Robots built by Knightscope are equipped with cameras facing in four separate directions to provide 360-degree vision. The footage captured by the robot can be monitored via cellphone and/or security personnel. Security companies charge an average of $7/hour or $61,000/year for that monitoring and police connections.

Camera systems with 360-degree vision are easily connected with motion detectors that can turn lights on and off, see packages where packages are not supposed to be and alert security staff, building staff and/or homeowners via cellphone alerts.

Dino Iuliano, chief revenue officer with Planned Communities, a concierge, security, maintenance and janitorial services firm, said, “We’re at the point where security in some homes and some buildings is starting to resemble security systems in casinos and airports.”