Key Highlights

  • Mansion Global regular weekly feature focuses on tax questions to real estate tax attorneys
  • Last week’s Mansion Global tax question to real estate tax attorneys looked at the relationship of property taxes and at-home learning

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One of Mansion Global’s weekly features focuses on real estate taxes. The online publication asks one tax question per week of real estate tax attorneys and those professionals then answer that question.

Last week’s tax question was taken straight from everyone’s experience of teaching/educating their children at-home in light of sheltering-in-place restrictions coming from governments all over the world due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Will communities where property taxes go to fund the local school system look to adjust them because children are being schooled at home?”

In New Jersey, Marc Pfeiffer, a senior policy fellow and assistant director at the Bloustein Local Government Research Center at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ, said there is little if any talk of changing property tax structures because schools are closed. Pheiffer said, “Teachers are still working.”

Teachers aren’t the only school personnel still working while students are being educated at home. Teacher’s aides and special-needs professionals are also online with teachers. And, since many children get their meals via their schools, cafeteria workers are also working to prepare those breakfasts and lunches. Bottom line according to Pheiffer in New Jersey – any savings that in the off chance may come from school personnel not currently working would be eaten up by the additional expenses necessary to bring classrooms online.

Jim Popp, a managing partner at an Austin TX-based firm called Popp Hutcheson, said that he also has “…heard no mention of school districts lowering taxes because of homeschooling.”

The same goes in Connecticut. Kathleen Merrigan, a residential real estate principal in the Cummings & Lockwood’s Private Clients Group in Greenwich, confirmed too that the issue of revamping property taxes as related to at-home learning has not yet been a source of conversation.

 

Thanks to Mansion Global.

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